Photo Times Observer by Brian Ferry A PennDOT crew attempts to clear a blocked pipe that runs under Jackson Run Road in Conewango Township on Friday as water covered more than half of the road. Traffic was allowed to cross the area in one direction at a time when possible.

Many parts of Warren County were hit by flooding on Friday.

Thursday’s weather conditions melted much of the snow blanketing Warren County. All that water had to go somewhere.

On Friday, responders responded to numerous calls for public service and mutual aid as individuals asked for help as rising waters threatened and penetrated homes.

Several roads were flooded and at least two vehicles were reported stuck in standing water.

But, overall, the flooding was manageable.

Photo Times Observer by Brian Ferry A PennDOT crew attempts to clear a blocked pipe that runs under Jackson Run Road in Conewango Township on Friday as water covered more than half of the road. Crew members used hand tools and an excavator and snowplow truck cleared some of the water out of the area.

“It’s not what we had planned” Warren County Public Safety Director Ken McCorrison said Friday afternoon. “We thought it could have been much worse.”

“A lot of auxiliary flows have passed over their banks”, said McCorrison. “But in the majority of places they did it in unpopulated areas.”

Some of the high water events were short lived.

“It looks like the ice will block up in places, the water will come back up, but as soon as the ice clears up, the water will recede,” he said.

On Jackson Run Road in Conewango Township, a frozen or clogged pipe caused water to back up and flood the road.

A PennDOT crew used hand tools and an excavator to clear the jam and a plow to move some of the water.

The crew allowed traffic to pass through the area in one direction at a time when possible. The highest part of the road—the westbound lane at the berm—had no standing water on it. Near the center of the road there were several inches of water and at the north berm the water was over a foot deep.

Flooded roads were reported in numerous locations across the county, including Routes 957 and 59 and Priest Hollow Road. A portion of Main Street/Tidioute Creek Road was closed in Tidioute and Triumph townships, according to PennDOT.

Thursday’s warm temperatures melted much of the snow in the county. The rain came later adding to the water needing a place to go.

These conditions also contributed to dense fog shrouding much of the county on Thursday evening.

“The fog played a role in people’s visibility,” said McCorrison. “There was so much fog you wouldn’t know you were driving in high water.”

Inconvenient weather is possible until Saturday morning. The National Weather Service issued a winter weather advisory in effect from 4 to 9 a.m. calling for up to two inches of snow and winds of up to 50 miles per hour.

“Anticipate slippery road conditions and poor visibility in snow and blowing snow,” according to the opinion. “A period of light snow could precede heavy snow squalls early Saturday morning. Snow squalls will be accompanied by gusty winds and very poor visibility.


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